October 25th, 2012

Shrimp Creole with Italian Sausage

Shrimp Creole with Italian Sausage



Today I published the fourth and final part of the journal that I kept when my husband and I went to Russia to adopt our daughter from an orphanage when she was five years old.  I also included several pictures, and if you would like to check it out, click here:

To Russia For Love, Part 4

With our daughter Makayla in front
of St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow.


Thanks to my friend Connie for sharing her Shrimp Creole recipe with me.  It has been passed down and treasured in her family for many years.  And for good reason. . . it’s delicious! The first time I made it, I knew I wanted to put it on my website.  I love all of the fresh vegetables in it.

And the shrimp, too.  I bought large tail-on shrimp and then removed the tails, but you can use any size shrimp.

I like a lot of spices, so I used spicy Italian sausage, which I thought was wonderful, but if you don’t like your food too spicy, you can use regular Italian sausage.  Connie is from the South and she serves this dish with grits instead of rice, so you may want to try it that way.  She also recommends Tony Chachere’s Creole Seasoning.

I know you will love this dish!

Shrimp Creole with Italian Sausage

Posted under Main Dishes

4 Responses to “Shrimp Creole with Italian Sausage”

  1. This looks good and your photos are stunning. I wanted to tell you that I have very much enjoyed reading about your Russian adoption story. It was not only heartwarming and lovely, but I also learned a ton about the Russian culture and it was very interesting to me. Thanks so much for sharing it!

  2. Michelle, thanks so much for your kind comment. I remembered another funny and strange story from Russia that I didn’t record in the journal, and I think I will share it here in the comment section. One day Olga prepared our main meal and served it to us. It was a whole chicken, and she brought it out and set it on the table and then went back into the kitchen. She usually did not eat with us. We proceeded to use a table knife to cut off a piece of the chicken, and although we made several attempts, we just couldn’t cut it. The best way to describe it is that it was sort of rubbery. When Olga came back out to the table, we indicated to her that we couldn’t cut the chicken, and she said, “Oh, that’s okay, I’ll take it back into the kitchen to cut it.” We assumed she would be using a sharp kitchen knife. Anyway, a few minutes later, she came out to the table again. This time she was apologizing because she wasn’t able to cut the chicken either! I don’t know what was wrong with that chicken, but boy it sure gave me a greater appreciation for our USDA inspected meats!

  3. Wow, I’m so glad you didn’t have the “opportunity” to taste the chicken! Yikes, that couldn’t have been good to consume. Thank you for sharing your wonderful memories and for your excellent recipes! I really love your blog.

  4. Yep, I was thinking the exact same thing about that chicken! Thanks again, Michelle! Come back any time!

Notify via Email Only if someone replies to My Comment

Search Winner Dinners